Tamagotchi Animation Tutorials!

Contains guides on how to draw your own tamagotchi artwork (making sprites/pixelling/animating); how to take tamagotchi photographs; post artwork/pictures etc

Tamagotchi Animation Tutorials!

Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Joined: Jan 30 2006, 09:19 PM

Feb 10 2007, 11:51 PM #1

:luck:

Hello and welcome, Tama-Zone members! This is my first in a series of tutorials on how to make Tamagotchi animations, as well as the basics on making your very own character and bringing it to life!
...not bring it to life as in putting it onto an actual Tamagotchi, but graphic-wise, yes.
Before we get started, if you read through all the tutorials and cand still can't complete an animation, I'll make one FOR you.

Okay, wetting started!

All modern-day screens for Tamagotchis are exactly 32 by 30 pixels wide. This is relatively small compared to other virtual pets (outside Tamagotchi, I mean, because there have been MUCH smaller Tamagotchis).



Since there is not a whole lot of room, Bandai worked out a system for all Tamagotchi characters. I discovered it and dubbed it the "Tamagotchi Size-Color Arch".



The Arch consists of 3 colors: Red, Light Blue and Bright Yellow. They can be any other color though.
The Arch is 16x16 pixels wide, and each color represents a different Tamagotchi age group. The smallest in the middle is for babies, and is 8x8 pixels in size. The second one is 12x12 pixels and is used for child AND teen characters. (Exceptions are seen on the V2 and V3) The final color is the full-size 16x16 pixel color, red, and is for all adult Tamagotchi characters.

Here is an example of how the Arch works, using Tsubutchi, Hitodetchi, YoungMimitchi, and Paparatchi:



Notice how none of them go anywhere outside their color.

Now the most important part of any Tamagotchi character is their animations. I will use Mametchi as an example of an "Animation Chart".



The chart follows a pattern:
Frames 1 and 2 are the character's "idle" poses. IT's how they float around on the screen.
Framed 3 and 4 are eating poses. The first appears when the food touches the ground and the second when the food starts to disappear. Some characters, like Tensaitchi and ShiroTeletchi have the two poses switched.
Frames 5 and 6 are running poses.
Frame 7 is the "head-shaking" pose. Simply try feeding it when it's not hungry or medicine when not sick to see it.
Frame 8 is the ever-important happy pose. Win a game and this pose appears along with the happy sun.
Frame 9 is the "facing away" pose. Sometimes your Tama does this when he/she has 0 happy hearts. Sometimes your Tama will spin in the air, and this will appear briefly. This also appears when putting on a costume.
Frame 10 is the unhappy pose. It appears before it cries or gets angry, and also when it sleeps.
Frame 11 is the crying pose. Usually appears after losing a game.
Frame 12 is the angry pose. It's much more difficult to see on the Entama/Uratama and V4, as the "discipline" option has been removed.
Frame 13 is the pleading pose. Usually appears when your Tamagotchi has had no hungry hearts filled for a while, or when your Tama uses a Love Potion.
Frame 14 is the upset pose. It usually appears when you feed your Tama some food it doesn't like, or make it play with a toy it doesn't like.
Frame 15 is the blushing pose. It appears when your Tama plays with a toy it DOES like.
Frame 16 is the jumping pose. It appears when your Tama plays with any toy.
Frames 17 and 18 are sitting poses. They appear when your Tama is playin with a toy or when it's on the toilet.
Frame 19 is the screaming/yelling pose. So far, it appears only on the Entama and Uratama, and maybe the V4.
Frame 20 is the dizzy pose. It usually appears when your Tama is standing on a ball or if you catch a big fish (both on v3). It also appears on an Entama/Uratama game with paper balloons. I'm not sure about other versions.
Frame 21 is the kissing pose. Japanese Tamagotchis kiss when mating, while other Tamas kiss after connecting and drinking love potion.
Any other animations not listed (such as fallen over) go after Frame 21. Under that is bed poses, bathing, and brushing teeth.

Baby, child, and teen charts are smaller, as they do not have as many animations.



In my next post, you'll learn how this is all used to make Tamagotchi animations, and how you can make your own!

~OM21
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Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Joined: Jan 30 2006, 09:19 PM

Feb 12 2007, 02:15 PM #2

How do you animate without downloading any thing?
:luck:

Sorry Jennie, but unless your computer comes with a GIF animator, there’s no way to animate an image without downloading a program.

But this brings me to the next section of the tutorial, where you’ll learn to do a relatively simple animation: eating!

Like Tamagotchi characters, all foods have a certain size and can be no bigger than 12x12 pixels (unless it’s a special food, like Steak, Birthday Cake, etc, which are 16x16 pixels, the same size as an adult character). They also have 3 different frames before vanishing.



The animation starts with the food appearing at the far left of the screen, 4 pixels down from the top of the screen. It stays like this for one second, with the Tamagotchi character in its “Idle 1” pose. After, the food touches the bottom and the Tamagotchi switches over to the “Eating” poses. First pose 1, then pose 2 as the food goes into its second frame. The Tama returns to eating pose 1, and it starts again until the food has gone through all 3 frames and vanishes. The frame with the food gone lasts for 1 second, while all the frames in between are 0.5 seconds.

For an example, we’ll once again use Mametchi to illustrate how this works:



For those who have a GIF animator, now is the time to use it. If you don't have one, download one off the internet. (I suggest Ulead GIF animator ^^) Save each one of the frames into its own file, then open the GIF animator and import all 7 frames. Time it correctly and save it. The final result should be something like this:



And for those that are asking, yes, you can go ahead and color it! It doesn’t have to be a boring and bland black and white! ^_^



More tutorials coming up soon!

~OM21
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Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Joined: Jan 30 2006, 09:19 PM

Mar 12 2007, 02:02 PM #3

PootyforNicky @ Feb 15 2007, 04:39 AM wrote: Bravo! I didn't know what order to make the charts in! And you're right, if your computer has NO GIF Animator that comes with it, you have to download. I use this:

Go to the Glitter Tutorial and download MS GIF Animator.
I've tried that one out. It's not a bad GIF animator, but you have to save each individual frame as a GIF file before putting them together and animating them. This lowers the image quality, especialy for those working with BMP and PNG images.

Examples:


(Notice how the one on the right is fuzzier. JPGs are even worse than GIFs, fyi)

~OM21
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JamesChaplin1
Tama Zone High ranks
JamesChaplin1
Tama Zone High ranks
Joined: Apr 3 2006, 01:22 PM

Sep 4 2007, 05:24 PM #4

Some people have been moaning about convertion Bitmap files to Gif Files, well here is a simple solution GiFFY. Download it, open it, click load BMP (now find your image from paint) then click open, now click Save GIF (now save it as you want it to becalled such as; frame1. Now do that as many times as frames as you have. Now you can use Microsoft Gif Animator without worrying :D
----------
Download GiFFY:
Here :D
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Hope this helps,
JC1! :jump:
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Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Osumesu21
Tama Zone Superstars
Joined: Jan 30 2006, 09:19 PM

Nov 23 2008, 05:11 PM #5

CREATING TAMAGOTCHI CHARACTERS
SOME RULES OF THUMB


Knowing the basics of how Tamagotchi characters look and feel, you may feel the desire to create your own, but have no idea where to start. No need to worry - I'm here to help!

Now, before I begin, allow me to show an example of two different sprites. They are both meant to represent a panda. From looking at the two, which one looks more like a panda to you?



That's right - the one on the left. Allow me to explain why by explaining the general guidelines of creating Tamagotchi characters:
  • The head must be large enough to display facial expression. In may or all cases, this means that it must be LARGER than the body itself (which then creates the stereotypical "how-do-they-walk-around-with-such-big-heads" problem associated with Tamagotchi characters). This is due to two things: the graphics limitations on Tamagotchi pets (though not so much on the TMGC+C), and that Tamagotchi are specifically created to show emotions, and a small head would make this difficult and bore the user.
  • Following the rule above, the body can't be too big. Larger bodies are much more difficult to manipulate for animations. Instead, keep the body somewhat small or make it a part of the Tamagotchi's head itself (take for example Glasstchi and Chandelitchi from the V5C). This is even more common with baby, child, and teen characters, as their sprites are much smaller than adult sprites.
  • Try and make sure that the characters are well-animated. The V2 was notorious for introducing very poorly-animated adult characters, who seemed to be very static with their animations, each representing the main "idle" pose with different faces (Pyonchitchi especially, who is also on the V4). A character with unique animations will be more pleasing to the person raising it.
In this sense, it's common to use several other characters as "templates" - building blocks for developing a character. Mametchi and Kuchipatchi are the most common, since their current sprites can be easily tweaked and remodeled into different adults. In fact, my sprite above was modeled from Mametchi!

~OM21
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